March 06, 2017 | Thought Leadership

I am a people person by nature.  An extrovert, sociable, Leo… and I know I can feed off of the energy of others so I like being in an office full of teammates.

I like working in person or, at the very least, on the phone, far more than doing business via email. Nine times out of 10, I’ll opt to pick up the phone before I’ll hit “reply” on an email because I think the work is better when we work in real time where we can discuss, evaluate and brainstorm through a project. Heck, that’s part of why I love my job as a Chief Marketing Officer– marketing is all about working with people and figuring out how to engage and interact with our buyers. Right?

Unfortunately, that’s not always the case. As marketing has grown up and embraced technology solutions that drive automation and efficiency, the discipline has lost some of its ‘human touch.’ Think about it – you’ve probably been on the receiving end of a generic marketing program that seems more robotic than human. And you’ve probably not responded to it.

Take that same generic program where you were put into a persona ‘bucket’ that was paper thin and reimagine it. What if you were approached with the same offer but in a way that seemed very personalized to your business? You might just see the value in the offering because it knew who you were and considered your particular needs. If you’ve received a marketing message that feels like this, the odds are good that it employed an Account Based Marketing (ABM) strategy.

I’m really excited about ABM for a lot of reasons including the fact that you can’t fake the connection. To make it successful, you have to be selective about your targets and you need to personalize your message, which means humanizing marketing again.

I’ve just written an article about ABM bringing the human element back to marketing for DemandGen Report, an excellent online site that looks at how to be successful with B2B marketing programs. The article is called ABM: Humanizing Marketing In 3 Steps and it looks at a three-pronged approach to implementing ABM in order to cultivate ongoing relationships with prospects and existing customers that grow revenue and share of wallet:

  1. Identify Compatible Accounts – ABM doesn’t work if you try to apply it across the board. How do you select the right accounts for this approach?
  2. Customize Campaigns – creating compelling content that isn’t on auto-pilot
  3. Chose the Right Team – hint: it’s not always your typical “A Player” that makes ABM successful. ABM requires team members that are inquisitive and curious in order to ID valuable opportunities and create a customized relationship.

We’ve deployed ABM here at Televerde – both for our own marketing programs and for our client programs, too, and we’re finding a lot of success with the approach.

Please take a look at the article and let me know what you think. Does it ring true to you and your business? Do you agree that the human element needs to come back to marketing and that ABM is an important step in the right direction? Are there holes in my approach to setting up an ABM strategy? I’d love to hear it all.

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